Top 5 data issues haunting your CIO

As data becomes increasingly commoditised, CIOs face mounting pressure to protect their customers’ information. We look at five of the most pressing issues CIOs should consider when identifying potential data centre partners

  • By Adam Tamburini, Senior Vice President (International), e-shelter | Monday, May 21st, 2018

With businesses now carrying more delicate and classified information than ever before, they are increasingly being confronted by cybercriminals who are prepared to use any means necessary to gain access to potentially lucrative data

Companies have never been required to keep their data as secure as they are right now. Businesses today have a greater responsibility to protect confidential information and, with GDPR on the horizon, these expectations are set to reach new levels. To add to this, the number of skilled cybercriminals capable of accessing sensitive databases has grown substantially.

Naturally, in the face of so many potential dangers, CIOs are searching for a partner that can keep their data properly protected and easily accessible. So, what are the greatest data centre threats that haunt a CIO and what do businesses need from an able data centre partner?

Here, we analyse the top five data issues CIOs should consider when identifying a data centre provider:

Physical data protection
It may appear to be very simple, but CIOs must realise that a high level of physical security is essential when protecting their sacred corporate data. Amid an increasing number of threats, CIOs must quickly establish the best way to nullify physical attacks.

CIOs must realise that a high level of physical security is essential when protecting their sacred corporate data

The presence of a highly professional security guard, an integrated alarm system and around-the-clock video surveillance is vital to the establishment of an adequately robust security foundation. Equally vital is the latest in ID and video recognition technology, which will help guarantee that access to the centre is limited to accredited personnel.

Cyber-warfare
But countering physical security threats isn’t the only challenge for CIOs: with businesses now carrying more delicate and classified information than ever before, they are being confronted by cybercriminals who are prepared to use any means necessary to gain access to potentially lucrative data.

Some of the more advanced data centres are able to restrict access to customer data through a range of controls, such as multifactor authentication, role-based access control and limiting the number of employees with constant access. Standing data encryption can also be used to safeguard against potential hacks and breaches.

Access control 
In a highly dynamic business world, CIOs need quick access to their data. As such, they will become increasingly frustrated if they experience continuous delays when accessing their stored information – and won’t hesitate to part ways with a data centre that fails to grant them access in a swift and seamless manner.

Companies must, therefore, choose a data centre partner that not only keeps hackers and cyber-terrorists out, but also provides swift and convenient access to CIOs when required.

Environmental sustainability
More CIOs are now focused on showcasing their company’s commitment to protecting the environment. With that in mind, businesses should look for a data centre partner with similar eco-sustainability goals, whether that be reducing emissions, ensuring sustainability or using renewable energy where possible.

If a CIO decides to align with a data centre that ignores these goals, it may well leave a business exposed to accusations of contradictory environmental policies.

Blackouts
Lastly, CIOs must make sure the data centre they choose has clear and well-defined plans in place to counteract realistic issues such as power outages, cooling failures – the heat generated by IT equipment means an interruption to cooling is almost as detrimental as a loss of power – and any technical communications issues.

With continuity a must in a highly-connected business world, CIOs cannot afford to partner with a data centre provider that is ill-prepared for such common issues.