The ‘Son of Concorde’ takes flight in 2021

Concorde ceased flying in 2003, but thanks to a joint venture between Airbus and Aerion, supersonic flights are making a comeback

  • Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

Aerion AS2 against mountains. The company is currently collaborating with Airbus to reinvigorate supersonic aircrafts

When Concorde got cancelled 12 years ago, business travellers lost the ability to fly from London to New York in three hours. But thanks to the combined efforts of airline manufacturers, Airbus and Aerion, supersonic flights are having a renaissance.

The manufacturers are currently working on the AS2, a new private jet capable of flying at 1.5 Mach (max), with the plan being to have it in the skies as early as 2021.

The jet will cater to the tastes of high-net-worth individuals

“Airbus Group has a long history of supporting innovation, and Aerion’s innovative aerodynamic technology unquestionably offers long-term benefits to the industry in terms of performance and efficiency”, said Doug Nichols, CEO of Aerion.

“We are targeting the first half of 2016 to select a propulsion system, which will enable us to formally launch the program shortly thereafter”, reported Nichols. 

Nicknamed the ‘Son of Concorde’, the plane will be made using carbon fibre and be capable of holding up to 12 passengers.

The jet is will also feature a luxurious interior, helping it cater to the tastes of high-net-worth individuals, who the aircraft is being marketed to. 

According to Aerion CEO Doug Nichols: “The message from many of today’s long-range business jet operators is very clear: They want a supersonic jet sooner rather than later; a cabin comparable in comfort to today’s long-range jets; a range of 5,000nm or better; and they are willing to pay more than $100m for such an aircraft.

“That is the supersonic jet we are working to deliver.”